[iSCSI] Support Windows Server 2008 direct iSCSI installation
[people/mdeck/gpxe.git] / src / arch / i386 / README.i386
1 Etherboot/NILO i386 initialisation path and external call interface
2 ===================================================================
3
4 1. Background
5
6 GCC compiles 32-bit code.  It is capable of producing
7 position-independent code, but the resulting binary is about 25%
8 bigger than the corresponding fixed-position code.  Since one main use
9 of Etherboot is as firmware to be burned into an EPROM, code size must
10 be kept as small as possible.
11
12 This means that we want to compile fixed-position code with GCC, and
13 link it to have a predetermined start address.  The problem then is
14 that we must know the address that the code will be loaded to when it
15 runs.  There are several ways to solve this:
16
17 1. Pick an address, link the code with this start address, then make
18    sure that the code gets loaded at that location.  This is
19    problematic, because we may pick an address that we later end up
20    wanting to use to load the operating system that we're booting.
21
22 2. Pick an address, link the code with this start address, then set up
23    virtual addressing so that the virtual addresses match the
24    link-time addresses regardless of the real physical address that
25    the code is loaded to.  This enables us to relocate Etherboot to
26    the top of high memory, where it will be out of the way of any
27    loading operating system.
28
29 3. Link the code with a text start address of zero and a data start
30    address also of zero.  Use 16-bit real mode and the
31    quasi-position-independence it gives you via segment addressing.
32    Doing this requires that we generate 16-bit code, rather than
33    32-bit code, and restricts us to a maximum of 64kB in each segment.
34
35 There are other possible approaches (e.g. including a relocation table
36 and code that performs standard dynamic relocation), but the three
37 options listed above are probably the best available.
38
39 Etherboot can be invoked in a variety of ways (ROM, floppy, as a PXE
40 NBP, etc).  Several of these ways involve control being passed to
41 Etherboot with the CPU in 16-bit real mode.  Some will involve the CPU
42 being in 32-bit protected mode, and there's an outside chance that
43 some may involve the CPU being in 16-bit protected mode.  We will
44 almost certainly have to effect a CPU mode change in order to reach
45 the mode we want to be in to execute the C code.
46
47 Additionally, Etherboot may wish to call external routines, such as
48 BIOS interrupts, which must be called in 16-bit real mode.  When
49 providing a PXE API, Etherboot must provide a mechanism for external
50 code to call it from 16-bit real mode.
51
52 Not all i386 builds of Etherboot will want to make real-mode calls.
53 For example, when built for LinuxBIOS rather than the standard PCBIOS,
54 no real-mode calls are necessary.
55
56 For the ultimate in PXE compatibility, we may want to build Etherboot
57 to run permanently in real mode.
58
59 There is a wide variety of potential combinations of mode switches
60 that we may wish to implement.  There are additional complications,
61 such as the inability to access a high-memory stack when running in
62 real mode.
63
64 2. Transition libraries
65
66 To handle all these various combinations of mode switches, we have
67 several "transition" libraries in Etherboot.  We also have the concept
68 of an "internal" and an "external" environment.  The internal
69 environment is the environment within which we can execute C code.
70 The external environment is the environment of whatever external code
71 we're trying to interface to, such as the system BIOS or a PXE NBP.
72
73 As well as having a separate addressing scheme, the internal
74 environment also has a separate stack.
75
76 The transition libraries are:
77
78 a) librm
79
80 librm handles transitions between an external 16-bit real-mode
81 environment and an internal 32-bit protected-mode environment with
82 virtual addresses.
83
84 b) libkir
85
86 libkir handles transitions between an external 16-bit real-mode (or
87 16:16 or 16:32 protected-mode) environment and an internal 16-bit
88 real-mode (or 16:16 protected-mode) environment.
89
90 c) libpm
91
92 libpm handles transitions between an external 32-bit protected-mode
93 environment with flat physical addresses and an internal 32-bit
94 protected-mode environment with virtual addresses.
95
96 The transition libraries handle the transitions required when
97 Etherboot is started up for the first time, the transitions required
98 to execute any external code, and the transitions required when
99 Etherboot exits (if it exits).  When Etherboot provides a PXE API,
100 they also handle the transitions required when a PXE client makes a
101 PXE API call to Etherboot.
102
103 Etherboot may use multiple transition libraries.  For example, an
104 Etherboot ELF image does not require librm for its initial transitions
105 from prefix to runtime, but may require librm for calling external
106 real-mode functions.
107
108 3. Setup and initialisation
109
110 Etherboot is conceptually divided into the prefix, the decompressor,
111 and the runtime image.  (For non-compressed images, the decompressor
112 is a no-op.)  The complete image comprises all three parts and is
113 distinct from the runtime image, which exclude the prefix and the
114 decompressor.
115
116 The prefix does several tasks:
117
118   Load the complete image into memory.  (For example, the floppy
119   prefix issues BIOS calls to load the remainder of the complete image
120   from the floppy disk into RAM, and the ISA ROM prefix copies the ROM
121   contents into RAM for faster access.)
122
123   Call the decompressor, if the runtime image is compressed.  This
124   decompresses the runtime image.
125
126   Call the runtime image's setup() routine.  This is a routine
127   implemented in assembly code which sets up the internal environment
128   so that C code can execute.
129
130   Call the runtime image's arch_initialise() routine.  This is a
131   routine implemented in C which does some basic startup tasks, such
132   as initialising the console device, obtaining a memory map and
133   relocating the runtime image to high memory.
134
135   Call the runtime image's arch_main() routine.  This records the exit
136   mechanism requested by the prefix and calls main().  (The prefix
137   needs to register an exit mechanism because by the time main()
138   returns, the memory occupied by the prefix has most likely been
139   overwritten.)
140
141 When acting as a PXE ROM, the ROM prefix contains an UNDI loader
142 routine in addition to its usual code.  The UNDI loader performs a
143 similar sequence of steps:
144
145   Load the complete image into memory.
146
147   Call the decompressor.
148
149   Call the runtime image's setup() routine.
150
151   Call the runtime image's arch_initialise() routine.
152
153   Call the runtime image's install_pxe_stack() routine.
154
155   Return to caller.
156
157 The runtime image's setup() routine will perform the following steps:
158
159   Switch to the internal environment using an appropriate transition
160   library.  This will record the parameters of the external
161   environment.
162
163   Set up the internal environment: load a stack, and set up a GDT for
164   virtual addressing if virtual addressing is to be used.
165
166   Switch back to the external environment using the transition
167   library.  This will record the parameters of the internal
168   environment.
169
170 Once the setup() routine has returned, the internal environment has been
171 set up ready for C code to run.  The prefix can call C routines using
172 a function from the transition library.
173
174 The runtime image's arch_initialise() routine will perform the
175 following steps:
176
177   Zero the bss
178
179   Initialise the console device(s) and print a welcome message.
180
181   Obtain a memory map via the INT 15,E820 BIOS call or suitable
182   fallback mechanism. [not done if libkir is being used]
183
184   Relocate the runtime image to the top of high memory. [not done if
185   libkir is being used]
186
187   Install librm to base memory. [done only if librm is being used]
188
189   Call initialise().
190
191   Return to the prefix, setting registers to indicate to the prefix
192   the new location of the transition library, if applicable.  Which
193   registers these are is specific to the transition library being
194   used.
195
196 Once the arch_initialise() routine has returned, the prefix will
197 probably call arch_main().