[ns8390] Use stub files instead of src/Config
[people/mdeck/gpxe.git] / src / Config
1 ##############################################################################
2 ##############################################################################
3 #
4 # IMPORTANT!
5
6 # The use of this file to set options that affect only single object
7 # files is deprecated, because changing anything in this file results
8 # in a complete rebuild, which is slow.  All options are gradually
9 # being migrated to config.h, which does not suffer from this problem.
10
11 # Only options that affect the entire build (e.g. overriding the $(CC)
12 # Makefile variable) should be placed in here.
13 #
14 ##############################################################################
15 ##############################################################################
16
17
18 #
19 # Config for Etherboot/32
20 #
21 #
22 # Do not delete the tag OptionDescription and /OptionDescription
23 # It is used to automatically generate the documentation.
24 #
25 # @OptionDescription@
26 #       User interaction options:
27 #
28 #       -DASK_BOOT=n
29 #                       Ask "Boot from (N)etwork ... or (Q)uit? " 
30 #                       at startup, timeout after n seconds (0 = no timeout).
31 #                       If unset or negative, don't ask and boot immediately
32 #                       using the default.
33 #       -DBOOT_FIRST
34 #       -DBOOT_SECOND
35 #       -DBOOT_THIRD
36 #                       On timeout or Return key from previous
37 #                       question, selects the order to try to boot from
38 #                       various devices.
39 #                       (alternatives: BOOT_NIC, BOOT_DISK,
40 #                        BOOT_FLOPPY, BOOT_NOTHING)
41 #                       See etherboot.h for prompt and answer strings.
42 #                       BOOT_DISK and BOOT_FLOPPY work only where a driver
43 #                       exists, e.g. in LinuxBIOS.
44 #                       They have no effect on PCBIOS.
45 #       -DBOOT_INDEX    The device to boot from 0 == any device.
46 #                       1 == The first nic found.
47 #                       2 == The second nic found
48 #                       ...
49 #                       BOOT_INDEX only applies to the BOOT_FIRST.  BOOT_SECOND 
50 #                       and BOOT_THIRD search through all of the boot devices.
51 #       -DBAR_PROGRESS
52 #                       Use rotating bar instead of sequential dots
53 #                       to indicate an IP packet transmitted.
54 #
55 #       Boot order options:
56 #
57 #       -DBOOT_CLASS_FIRST
58 #       -DBOOT_CLASS_SECOND
59 #       -DBOOT_CLASS_THIRD
60 #                       Select the priority of the boot classes
61 #                       Valid values are:
62 #                               BOOT_NIC
63 #                               BOOT_DISK
64 #                               BOOT_FLOPPY
65 #       BOOT_DISK and BOOT_FLOPPY work only where a driver exists,
66 #       e.g. in LinuxBIOS.  They have no effect on PCBIOS.
67 #
68 #       Boot autoconfiguration protocol options:
69 #
70 #       -DALTERNATE_DHCP_PORTS_1067_1068
71 #                       Use ports 1067 and 1068 for DHCP instead of 67 and 68.
72 #                       As these ports are non-standard, you need to configure
73 #                       your DHCP server to use them. This option gets around
74 #                       existing DHCP servers which cannot be touched, for
75 #                       one reason or another, at the cost of non-standard
76 #                       boot images.
77 #       -DNO_DHCP_SUPPORT
78 #                       Use BOOTP instead of DHCP.
79 #       -DRARP_NOT_BOOTP
80 #                       Use RARP instead of BOOTP/DHCP.
81 #       -DREQUIRE_VCI_ETHERBOOT
82 #                       Require an encapsulated Vendor Class Identifier
83 #                       of "Etherboot" in the DHCP reply
84 #                       Requires DHCP support.
85 #       -DDHCP_CLIENT_ID=\"Identifier\"
86 #       -DDHCP_CLIENT_ID_LEN=<Client ID length in octets>
87 #       -DDHCP_CLIENT_ID_TYPE=<Client ID type>
88 #                       Specify a RFC2132 Client Identifier option, length and type.
89 #                       Requires DHCP support.
90 #       -DDHCP_USER_CLASS=\"UserClass\"
91 #       -DDHCP_USER_CLASS_LEN=<User Class length in octets>
92 #                       Specify a RFC3004 User Class option and length. Use this
93 #                       option to set a UC (or multiple UCs) rather than munge the
94 #                       client Vendor Class ID.
95 #                       Requires DHCP support.
96 #       -DALLOW_ONLY_ENCAPSULATED
97 #                       Ignore Etherboot-specific options that are not within
98 #                       the Etherboot encapsulated options field.  This option
99 #                       should be enabled unless you have a legacy DHCP server
100 #                       configuration from the bad old days before the use of
101 #                       encapsulated Etherboot options.
102 #       -DDEFAULT_BOOTFILE=\"default_bootfile_name\"
103 #                       Define a default bootfile for the case where your DHCP
104 #                       server does not provide the information.  Example:
105 #                         -DDEFAULT_BOOTFILE="tftp:///tftpboot/kernel"
106 #                       If you do not specify this option, then DHCP offers that
107 #                       do not specify bootfiles will be ignored.
108 #
109 #       NIC tuning parameters:
110 #
111 #       -DALLMULTI
112 #                       Turns on multicast reception in the NICs.
113 #
114 #       Boot tuning parameters:
115 #
116 #       -DCONGESTED
117 #                       Turns on packet retransmission.  Use it on a
118 #                       congested network, where the normal operation
119 #                       can't boot the image.
120 #       -DBACKOFF_LIMIT
121 #                       Sets the maximum RFC951 backoff exponent to n.
122 #                       Do not set this unreasonably low, because on networks
123 #                       with many machines they can saturate the link
124 #                       (the delay corresponding to the exponent is a random
125 #                       time in the range 0..3.5*2^n seconds).  Use 5 for a
126 #                       VERY small network (max. 2 minutes delay), 7 for a
127 #                       medium sized network (max. 7.5 minutes delay) or 10
128 #                       for a really huge network with many clients, frequent
129 #                       congestions (max. 1  hour delay).  On average the
130 #                       delay time will be half the maximum value.  If in
131 #                       doubt about the consequences, use a larger value.
132 #                       Also keep in mind that the number of retransmissions
133 #                       is not changed by this setting, so the default of 20
134 #                       may no longer be appropriate.  You might need to set
135 #                       MAX_ARP_RETRIES, MAX_BOOTP_RETRIES, MAX_TFTP_RETRIES
136 #                       and MAX_RPC_RETRIES to a larger value.
137 #       -DTIMEOUT=n
138 #                       Use with care!! See above.
139 #                       Sets the base of RFC2131 sleep interval to n.
140 #                       This can be used with -DBACKOFF_LIMIT=0 to get a small
141 #                       and constant (predictable) retry interval for embedded
142 #                       devices. This is to achieve short boot delays if both
143 #                       the DHCP Server and the embedded device will be powered
144 #                       on the same time. Otherwise if the DHCP server is ready
145 #                       the client could sleep the next exponentially timeout,
146 #                       e.g. 70 seconds or more. This is not what you want.
147 #                       n should be a multiple of TICKS_PER_SEC (18).
148 #
149 #       Boot device options:
150 #
151 #       -DTRY_FLOPPY_FIRST
152 #                       If > 0, tries that many times to read the boot
153 #                       sector from a floppy drive before booting from
154 #                       ROM. If successful, does a local boot.
155 #                       It assumes the floppy is bootable.
156 #       -DEXIT_IF_NO_OFFER
157 #                       If no IP offer is obtained, exit and
158 #                       let the BIOS continue.
159 #                       The accessibility of the TFTP server has no effect,
160 #                       so configure your DHCP/BOOTP server properly.
161 #                       You should probably reduce MAX_BOOTP_RETRIES
162 #                       to a small number like 3.
163 #
164 #       Boot image options:
165 #
166 #       -DFREEBSD_KERNEL_ENV
167 #                       Pass in FreeBSD kernel environment
168 #       -DAOUT_LYNX_KDI
169 #                       Add Lynx a.out KDI support
170 #       -DMULTICAST_LEVEL1
171 #                       Support for sending multicast packets
172 #       -DMULTICAST_LEVEL2
173 #                       Support for receiving multicast packets
174 #
175 #       Interface export options:
176 #
177 #       -DPXE_EXPORT
178 #                       Export a PXE API interface.  This is work in
179 #                       progress.  Note that you won't be able to load
180 #                       PXE NBPs unless you also use -DPXE_IMAGE.
181 #       -DPXE_STRICT
182 #                       Strict(er) compliance with the PXE
183 #                       specification as published by Intel.  This may
184 #                       or may not be a good thing depending on your
185 #                       view of the spec...
186 #       -DPXE_DHCP_STRICT
187 #                       Strict compliance of the DHCP request packets
188 #                       with the PXE specification as published by
189 #                       Intel.  This may or may not be a good thing
190 #                       depending on your view of whether requesting
191 #                       vendor options which don't actually exist is
192 #                       pointless or not. You probably want this
193 #                       option if you intend to use Windows RIS or
194 #                       similar.
195 #
196 #       Obscure options you probably don't need to touch:
197 #
198 #       -DZPXE_SUFFIX_STRIP
199 #                       If the last 5 characters of the filename passed to Etherboot is
200 #                       ".zpxe" then strip it off. This is useful in cases where a DHCP server
201 #                       is not able to be configured to support conditionals. The way it works
202 #                       is that the DHCP server is configured with a filename like
203 #                       "foo.nbi.zpxe" so that when PXE asks for a filename it gets that, and
204 #                       loads Etherboot from that file. Etherboot then starts up and once
205 #                       again asks the DHCP server for a filename and once again gets
206 #                       foo.nbi.zpxe, but with this option turned on loads "foo.nbi" instead.
207 #                       This allows people to use Etherboot who might not otherwise be able to
208 #                       because their DHCP servers won't let them.
209 #
210 #       -DPOWERSAVE
211 #                       Halt the processor when waiting for keyboard input
212 #                       which saves power while waiting for user interaction.
213 #                       Good for compute clusters and VMware emulation.
214 #                       But may not work for all CPUs.
215 #
216 # @/OptionDescription@
217
218 # These default settings compile Etherboot with a small number of options.
219 # You may wish to enable more of the features if the size of your ROM allows.
220
221
222 # For prompting and default on timeout
223 # CFLAGS+=      -DASK_BOOT=3 -DBOOT_FIRST=BOOT_NIC
224 # If you would like to attempt to boot from other devices as well as the network.
225 # CFLAGS+=      -DBOOT_SECOND=BOOT_FLOPPY
226 # CFLAGS+=      -DBOOT_THIRD=BOOT_DISK
227 # CFLAGS+=      -DBOOT_INDEX=0
228
229 # If you prefer the old style rotating bar progress display
230 # CFLAGS+=      -DBAR_PROGRESS
231
232 # Show size indicator
233 # CFLAGS+=      -DSIZEINDICATOR
234
235 # Enabling this creates non-standard images which use ports 1067 and 1068
236 # for DHCP/BOOTP
237 # CFLAGS+=      -DALTERNATE_DHCP_PORTS_1067_1068
238
239 # Enabling this makes the boot ROM require a Vendor Class Identifier
240 # of "Etherboot" in the Vendor Encapsulated Options
241 # This can be used to reject replies from servers other than the one
242 # we want to give out addresses to us, but it will prevent Etherboot
243 # from getting an IP lease until you have configured DHCPD correctly
244 # CFLAGS+=      -DREQUIRE_VCI_ETHERBOOT
245
246 # EXPERIMENTAL! Set DHCP_CLIENT_ID to create a Client Identifier (DHCP
247 # option 61, see RFC2132 section 9.14) when Etherboot sends the DHCP
248 # DISCOVER and REQUEST packets.  This ID must UNIQUELY identify each
249 # client on your local network.  Set DHCP_CLIENT_ID_TYPE to the
250 # appropriate hardware type as described in RFC2132 / RFC1700; this
251 # almost certainly means using '1' if the Client ID is an Ethernet MAC
252 # address and '0' otherwise. Set DHCP_CLIENT_ID_LEN to the length of
253 # the Client ID in octets (this is not a null terminated C string, do
254 # NOT add 1 for a terminator and do NOT add an extra 1 for the
255 # hardware type octet).  Note that to identify your client using the
256 # normal default MAC address of your NIC, you do NOT need to set this
257 # option, as the MAC address is automatically used in the
258 # hwtype/chaddr field; note also that this field only sets the DHCP
259 # option: it does NOT change the MAC address used by the client.
260
261 # CFLAGS+=      -DDHCP_CLIENT_ID="'C','L','I','E','N','T','0','0','1'" \
262 #               -DDHCP_CLIENT_ID_LEN=9 -DDHCP_CLIENT_ID_TYPE=0
263
264 # CFLAGS+=      -DDHCP_CLIENT_ID="0xDE,0xAD,0xBE,0xEF,0xDE,0xAD" \
265 #               -DDHCP_CLIENT_ID_LEN=6 -DDHCP_CLIENT_ID_TYPE=1
266
267 # EXPERIMENTAL! Set DHCP_USER_CLASS to create a User Class option (see
268 # RFC3004) when Etherboot sends the DHCP DISCOVER and REQUEST packets.
269 # This can be used for classification of clients, typically so that a
270 # DHCP server can send an appropriately tailored reply.  Normally, a
271 # string identifies a class of to which this client instance belongs
272 # which is useful in your network, such as a department ('FINANCE' or
273 # 'MARKETING') or hardware type ('THINCLIENT' or 'KIOSK').  Set
274 # DHCP_USER_CLASS_LEN to the length of DHCP_USER_CLASS in octets.
275 # This is NOT a null terminated C string, do NOT add 1 for a
276 # terminator.  RFC3004 advises how to lay out multiple User Class
277 # options by using an octet for the length of each string, as in this
278 # example.  It is, of course, up to the server to parse this.
279
280 # CFLAGS+=      -DDHCP_USER_CLASS="'T','E','S','T','C','L','A','S','S'" \
281 #               -DDHCP_USER_CLASS_LEN=9
282
283 # CFLAGS+=      -DDHCP_USER_CLASS="5,'A','L','P','H','A',4,'B','E','T','A'" \
284 #               -DDHCP_USER_CLASS_LEN=11
285
286 # Enabling this causes Etherboot to ignore Etherboot-specific options
287 # that are not within an Etherboot encapsulated options field.
288 # This option should be enabled unless you have a legacy DHCP server
289 # configuration from the bad old days before the use of
290 # encapsulated Etherboot options.
291 # CFLAGS+=      -DALLOW_ONLY_ENCAPSULATED
292
293 # Disable DHCP support
294 # CFLAGS+=      -DNO_DHCP_SUPPORT
295
296 # Specify a default bootfile to be used if the DHCP server does not
297 # provide the information.  If you do not specify this option, then
298 # DHCP offers that do not contain bootfiles will be ignored.
299 # CFLAGS+=      -DDEFAULT_BOOTFILE=\"tftp:///tftpboot/kernel\"
300
301 # Limit the delay on packet loss/congestion to a more bearable value. See
302 # description above.  If unset, do not limit the delay between resend.
303 # CFLAGS+=      -DBACKOFF_LIMIT=5 -DCONGESTED
304
305 # More optional features
306 # CFLAGS+=      -DTRY_FLOPPY_FIRST=4
307 # CFLAGS+=      -DEXIT_IF_NO_OFFER
308
309
310 # Multicast Support
311 # CFLAGS+=      -DALLMULTI -DMULTICAST_LEVEL1 -DMULTICAST_LEVEL2
312
313 # Etherboot as a PXE network protocol ROM
314 # CFLAGS+=      -DPXE_IMAGE -DPXE_EXPORT
315 # Etherboot stricter as a PXE network protocol ROM
316 # CFLAGS+=      -DPXE_DHCP_STRICT
317
318 # Support for PXE emulation. Works only with FreeBSD to load the kernel
319 # via pxeboot, use only with DOWNLOAD_PROTO_NFS
320 # CFLAGS+=      -DFREEBSD_PXEEMU
321
322
323
324 # Garbage from Makefile.main temporarily placed here until a home can
325 # be found for it.
326
327 # NS8390 options:
328 #       -DINCLUDE_NE    - Include NE1000/NE2000 support
329 #       -DNE_SCAN=list  - Probe for NE base address using list of
330 #                         comma separated hex addresses
331 #       -DINCLUDE_3C503 - Include 3c503 support
332 #         -DT503_SHMEM  - Use 3c503 shared memory mode (off by default)
333 #       -DINCLUDE_WD    - Include Western Digital/SMC support
334 #       -DWD_DEFAULT_MEM- Default memory location for WD/SMC cards
335 #       -DWD_790_PIO    - Read/write to WD/SMC 790 cards in PIO mode (default
336 #                         is to use shared memory) Try this if you get "Bogus
337 #                         packet, ignoring" messages, common on ISA/PCI hybrid
338 #                         systems.
339 #       -DCOMPEX_RL2000_FIX
340 #
341 #       If you have a Compex RL2000 PCI 32-bit (11F6:1401),
342 #       and the bootrom hangs in "Probing...[NE*000/PCI]",
343 #       try enabling this fix... it worked for me :).
344 #       In the first packet write somehow it somehow doesn't
345 #       get back the expected data so it is stuck in a loop.
346 #       I didn't bother to investigate what or why because it works
347 #       when I interrupt the loop if it takes more then COMPEX_RL2000_TRIES.
348 #       The code will notify if it does a abort.
349 #       SomniOne - somnione@gmx.net
350 #
351 # 3C90X options:
352 #       Warning Warning Warning
353 #       If you use any of the XCVR options below, please do not complain about
354 #       the behaviour with Linux drivers to the kernel developers. You are
355 #       on your own if you do this. Please read 3c90x.txt to understand
356 #       what they do. If you don't understand them, ask for help on the
357 #       Etherboot mailing list. And please document what you did to the NIC
358 #       on the NIC so that people after you won't get nasty surprises.
359 #
360 #       -DCFG_3C90X_PRESERVE_XCVR - Reset the transceiver type to the value it
361 #                         had initially just before the loaded code is started.
362 #       -DCFG_3C90X_XCVR - Hardcode the tranceiver type Etherboot uses.
363 #       -DCFG_3C90X_BOOTROM_FIX - If you have a 3c905B with buggy ROM
364 #                         interface, setting this option might "fix" it.  Use
365 #                         with caution and read the docs in 3c90x.txt!
366 #
367 #       See the documentation file 3c90x.txt for more details.
368 #
369 # CS89X0 (optional) options:
370 #       -DISA_PROBE_ADDRS=list  
371 #                         Probe for CS89x0 base address using list of
372 #                         comma separated hex addresses; increasing the
373 #                         address by one (0x300 -> 0x301) will force a
374 #                         more aggressive probing algorithm. This might
375 #                         be neccessary after a soft-reset of the NIC.