Update docs
authorandersen <andersen@69ca8d6d-28ef-0310-b511-8ec308f3f277>
Sat, 27 Mar 2004 09:40:15 +0000 (09:40 +0000)
committerandersen <andersen@69ca8d6d-28ef-0310-b511-8ec308f3f277>
Sat, 27 Mar 2004 09:40:15 +0000 (09:40 +0000)
git-svn-id: svn://busybox.net/trunk/busybox@8661 69ca8d6d-28ef-0310-b511-8ec308f3f277

README
TODO [deleted file]
docs/busybox_footer.pod
docs/busybox_header.pod

diff --git a/README b/README
index 14cc845..631d4c1 100644 (file)
--- a/README
+++ b/README
@@ -2,44 +2,40 @@ Please see the LICENSE file for details on copying and usage.
 
 BusyBox combines tiny versions of many common UNIX utilities into a single
 small executable. It provides minimalist replacements for most of the utilities
-you usually find in fileutils, shellutils, findutils, textutils, grep, gzip,
-tar, etc. BusyBox provides a fairly complete POSIX environment for any small or
-embedded system. The utilities in BusyBox generally have fewer options than
-their full featured GNU cousins; however, the options that are included provide
-the expected functionality and behave very much like their GNU counterparts.
-
-BusyBox was originally written to support the Debian Rescue/Install disks, but
-it also makes an excellent environment for any small or embedded system.
+you usually find in GNU coreutils, util-linux, etc. The utilities in BusyBox
+generally have fewer options than their full-featured GNU cousins; however, the
+options that are included provide the expected functionality and behave very
+much like their GNU counterparts. BusyBox provides a fairly complete POSIX
+environment for any small or embedded system.
 
 BusyBox has been written with size-optimization and limited resources in mind.
 It is also extremely modular so you can easily include or exclude commands (or
 features) at compile time. This makes it easy to customize your embedded
-systems. To create a working system, just add /dev, /etc, and a kernel.
+systems. To create a working system, just add /dev, /etc, and a Linux kernel.
 
-As of version 0.20 there is now a version number. : ) Also as of version 0.20,
-BusyBox is now modularized to easily allow you to build only the components you
-need, thereby reducing binary size. Run 'make config' or 'make menuconfig'
-for select the functionality that you wish to enable.
+BusyBox is extremely configurable.  This allows you to include only the
+components you need, thereby reducing binary size. Run 'make config' or
+'make menuconfig' for select the functionality that you wish to enable.
 
 After the build is complete, a busybox.links file is generated.  This is
-used by 'make install' to create symlinks to the busybox binary for all
+used by 'make install' to create symlinks to the BusyBox binary for all
 compiled in functions.  By default, 'make install' will place the symlink
 forest into `pwd`/_install unless you have defined the PREFIX environment
 variable (i.e., 'make PREFIX=/tmp/foo install')
 
-If you wish to install hardlinks, rather than symlinks, you can use
-'make install-hardlinks' instead.
+If you wish to install hard links, rather than symlinks, you can use
+'make PREFIX=/tmp/foo install-hardlinks' instead.
 
 ----------------
 
 Supported architectures:
 
-   Busybox in general will build on any architecture supported by gcc.  It has
+   BusyBox in general will build on any architecture supported by gcc.  It has
    a few specialized features added for __sparc__ and __alpha__.  insmod
    functionality is currently limited to x86, ARM, SH3/4, powerpc, m68k,
    MIPS, cris, and v850e.
 
-Supported libcs:
+Supported C Libraries:
 
    glibc-2.0.x, glibc-2.1.x, glibc-2.2.x, glibc-2.3.x, uClibc.  People
    are looking at newlib and diet-libc, but consider them unsupported,
@@ -66,7 +62,7 @@ the mailing list if you are interested.
 
 Bugs:
 
-If you find bugs, please submit a detailed bug report to the busybox mailing
+If you find bugs, please submit a detailed bug report to the BusyBox mailing
 list at busybox@mail.busybox.net.  A well-written bug report should include a
 transcript of a shell session that demonstrates the bad behavior and enables
 anyone else to duplicate the bug on their own machine. The following is such
@@ -76,21 +72,21 @@ an example:
     From: diligent@testing.linux.org
     Subject: /bin/date doesn't work
 
-    Package: busybox
+    Package: BusyBox
     Version: 1.00
 
-    When I execute Busybox 'date' it produces unexpected results.
+    When I execute BusyBox 'date' it produces unexpected results.
     With GNU date I get the following output:
 
        $ date
-       Wed Mar 21 14:19:41 MST 2001
+       Sat Mar 27 14:19:41 MST 2004
 
     But when I use BusyBox date I get this instead:
 
        $ date
-       llegal instruction
+       illegal instruction
 
-    I am using Debian unstable, kernel version 2.4.19-rmk1 on an Netwinder,
+    I am using Debian unstable, kernel version 2.4.25-vrs2 on a Netwinder,
     and the latest uClibc from CVS.  Thanks for the wonderful program!
 
        -Diligent
@@ -101,7 +97,7 @@ reports lacking such detail may never be fixed...  Thanks for understanding.
 
 ----------------
 
-FTP:
+Downloads:
 
 Source for the latest released version, as well as daily snapshots, can always
 be downloaded from
@@ -125,5 +121,4 @@ For those that are actively contributing there is even CVS write access:
 Please feed suggestions, bug reports, insults, and bribes back to:
        Erik Andersen
        <andersen@codepoet.org>
-       <andersen@codepoet.org>
 
diff --git a/TODO b/TODO
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 7a8fa4d..0000000
--- a/TODO
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,49 +0,0 @@
-TODO list for busybox in no particular order. Just because something
-is listed here doesn't mean that it is going to be added to busybox,
-or that doing so is even a good idea. It just means that we _might_ get
-around to it some time. If you have any good ideas, please send them
-on in...
-
- -Erik
-
------------
-
-Possible apps to include some time:
-
-* group/commonize strings, remove dups (for i18n, l10n)
-
------------
-
-With sysvinit, reboot, poweroff and halt all used a named pipe,
-/dev/initctl, to communicate with the init process.  Busybox
-currently uses signals to communicate with init.  This makes
-busybox incompatible with sysvinit.  We should probably use
-a named pipe as well so we can be compatible.
-
------------------------
-
-Run the following:
-
-    rm -f busybox && make LDFLAGS+=-nostdlib 2>&1 | \
-       sed -ne 's/.*undefined reference to `\(.*\)..*/\1/gp' | sort | uniq
-
-reveals the list of all external (i.e., libc) things that BusyBox depends on.
-It would be a very nice thing to reduce this list to an absolute minimum, to
-reduce the footprint of busybox, especially when staticly linking with
-libraries such as uClibc.
-
------------------------
-
-Compile with debugging on, run 'nm --size-sort ./busybox'
-and then start with the biggest things and make them smaller...
-
------------------------
-
-xargs could use a -l option
-
-------------------------------------------------------------------
-
-libbb/unzip.c and archival/gzip.c have common constant static arrays and
-code for initializing the CRC array. Both use CRC-32 and could use
-common code for CRC calculation. Within archival/gzip.c, the CRC
-array should be malloc-ed as it is in libbb/unzip.c .
index d243a92..4f10585 100644 (file)
@@ -1,23 +1,5 @@
 =back
 
-=head1 LIBC NSS
-
-GNU Libc uses the Name Service Switch (NSS) to configure the behavior of the C
-library for the local environment, and to configure how it reads system data,
-such as passwords and group information.  BusyBox has made it Policy that it
-will never use NSS, and will never use and libc calls that make use of NSS.
-This allows you to run an embedded system without the need for installing an
-/etc/nsswitch.conf file and without and /lib/libnss_* libraries installed.
-
-If you are using a system that is using a remote LDAP server for authentication
-via GNU libc NSS, and you want to use BusyBox, then you will need to adjust the
-BusyBox source.  Chances are though, that if you have enough space to install
-of that stuff on your system, then you probably want the full GNU utilities.
-
-=head1 SEE ALSO
-
-textutils(1), shellutils(1), etc...
-
 =head1 MAINTAINER
 
 Erik Andersen <andersen@codepoet.org>
@@ -173,4 +155,4 @@ Glenn Engel <glenne@engel.org>
 
 =cut
 
-# $Id: busybox_footer.pod,v 1.13 2004/03/13 08:32:14 andersen Exp $
+# $Id: busybox_footer.pod,v 1.14 2004/03/27 09:40:15 andersen Exp $
index 132aa3b..395e2c8 100644 (file)
@@ -14,42 +14,67 @@ BusyBox - The Swiss Army Knife of Embedded Linux
 
 BusyBox combines tiny versions of many common UNIX utilities into a single
 small executable. It provides minimalist replacements for most of the utilities
-you usually find in fileutils, shellutils, findutils, textutils, grep, gzip,
-tar, etc.  BusyBox provides a fairly complete POSIX environment for any small
-or embedded system.  The utilities in BusyBox generally have fewer options than
-their full-featured GNU cousins; however, the options that are included provide
-the expected functionality and behave very much like their GNU counterparts.
+you usually find in GNU coreutils, util-linux, etc. The utilities in BusyBox
+generally have fewer options than their full-featured GNU cousins; however, the
+options that are included provide the expected functionality and behave very
+much like their GNU counterparts. BusyBox provides a fairly complete POSIX
+environment for any small or embedded system.
 
 BusyBox has been written with size-optimization and limited resources in mind.
 It is also extremely modular so you can easily include or exclude commands (or
-features) at compile time.  This makes it easy to customize your embedded
-systems.  To create a working system, just add a kernel, a shell (such as ash),
-and an editor (such as elvis-tiny or ae).
+features) at compile time. This makes it easy to customize your embedded
+systems. To create a working system, just add /dev, /etc, and a Linux kernel.
+
+BusyBox is extremely configurable.  This allows you to include only the
+components you need, thereby reducing binary size. Run 'make config' or 'make
+menuconfig' for select the functionality that you wish to enable.  The run
+'make' to compile BusyBox using your configuration.
+
+After the compile has finished, you should use 'make install' to install
+BusyBox.  This will install the '/bin/busybox' binary, and will also create
+symlinks pointing to the '/bin/busybox' binary for each utility that you
+compile into BusyBox.  By default, 'make install' will place these symlinks
+into the './_install' directory, unless you have defined 'PREFIX', thereby
+specifying some alternative location (i.e., 'make PREFIX=/tmp/foo install').
+If you wish to install using hardlinks, rather than the default of using
+symlinks, you can use 'make PREFIX=/tmp/foo install-hardlinks' instead.
 
 =head1 USAGE
 
-When you create a link to BusyBox for the function you wish to use, when BusyBox
-is called using that link it will behave as if the command itself has been invoked.
+BusyBox is a multi-call binary.  A multi-call binary is an executable program
+that performs the same job as more than one utility program.  That means there
+is just a single BusyBox binary, but that single binary acts like a large
+number of utilities.  This allows BusyBox to be smaller since all the built-in
+utility programs (we call them applets) can share code for many common operations.
+
+You can also invoke BusyBox by issuing the command as an argument on the
+command line.  For example, entering
+
+       /bin/busybox ls
+
+will also cause BusyBox to behave as 'ls'.
+
+Of course, adding '/bin/busybox' into every command would be painful.  So most
+people will invoke BusyBox using links to the BusyBox binary.
 
 For example, entering
 
-       ln -s ./BusyBox ls
+       ln -s /bin/busybox ls
        ./ls
 
 will cause BusyBox to behave as 'ls' (if the 'ls' command has been compiled
-into BusyBox).
-
-You can also invoke BusyBox by issuing the command as an argument on the
-command line.  For example, entering
+into BusyBox).  Generally speaking, you should never need to make all these
+links yourself, as the BusyBox build system will do this for you when you run
+the 'make install' command.
 
-       ./BusyBox ls
-
-will also cause BusyBox to behave as 'ls'.
+If you invoke BusyBox with no arguments, it will provide you with a list of the
+applets that have been compiled into your BusyBox binary.
 
 =head1 COMMON OPTIONS
 
-Most BusyBox commands support the B<-h> option to provide a
-terse runtime description of their behavior.
+Most BusyBox commands support the B<--help> argument to provide a terse runtime
+description of their behavior.  If the CONFIG_FEATURE_VERBOSE_USAGE option has
+been enabled, more detailed usage information will also be available.
 
 =head1 COMMANDS
 
@@ -80,4 +105,26 @@ Currently defined functions include:
 
 =over 4
 
+=head1 LIBC NSS
+
+GNU Libc (glibc) uses the Name Service Switch (NSS) to configure the behavior
+of the C library for the local environment, and to configure how it reads
+system data, such as passwords and group information.  This is implemented
+using an /etc/nsswitch.conf configuration file, and using one or more of the
+/lib/libnss_* libraries.  BusyBox tries to avoid using any libc calls that make
+use of NSS.  Some applets, such as login and su, will use libc functions that
+usually require NSS.
+
+If you enable CONFIG_USE_BB_PWD_GRP, BusyBox will use internal functions to
+directly access the /etc/passwd, /etc/group, and /etc/shadow files without
+using NSS.  This may allow you to run your system without the need for
+installing any of the NSS configuration files and libraries.
+
+When used with glibc, the BusyBox 'networking' applets will similarly require
+that you install at least some of the glibc NSS stuff (in particular,
+/etc/nsswitch.conf, /lib/libnss_dns*, /lib/libnss_files*, and /lib/libresolv*).
+
+Shameless Plug: As an alternative one could use a C library such as uClibc.  In
+addition to making your system significantly smaller, uClibc does not need or
+use any NSS support files or libraries.