53cebd578fab45def5902a96a68425304be8a9da
[people/mcb30/busybox.git] / docs / Configure.help
1 # BusyBox configuration option Help File
2 #
3 # Format of this file: description<nl>variable<nl>help text<nl><nl>.
4 # The help texts may contain empty lines, but every non-empty line must
5 # be indented two positions.  Order of the help texts does not matter,
6 # however, no variable should be documented twice: if it is, only the
7 # first occurrence will be used. We try to keep the help texts of related
8 # variables close together. Lines starting with `#' are ignored. To be
9 # nice to menuconfig, limit your line length to 70 characters. 
10 #
11 # Comments of the form "# Choice:" followed by a menu name are used
12 # internally by the maintainers' consistency-checking tools.
13 #
14 # If you add a help text to this file, please try to be as gentle as
15 # possible. Don't use unexplained acronyms and generally write for the
16 # hypothetical ignorant but intelligent user who has just bought a PC,
17 # removed Windows, installed Linux and is now compiling up BusyBox
18 # for the first time. Tell them what to do if they're unsure. 
19 #
20 # Mention all the relevant READMEs and HOWTOs in the help text.
21 # Make them file URLs relative to the top level of the source tree so
22 # that help browsers can turn them into hotlinks.  All URLs ahould be
23 # surrounded by <>.
24 #
25 # Repetitions are fine since the help texts are not meant to be read
26 # in sequence.  It is good style to include URLs pointing to more
27 # detailed technical information, pictures of the hardware, etc.
28 #
29 # The most important thing to include in a help entry is *motivation*.
30 # Explain why someone configuring BusyBox might want to select your
31 # option.
32 #
33
34 Show verbose applets usage message
35 CONFIG_FEATURE_VERBOSE_USAGE
36   All BusyBox applets will show more verbose help messages when
37   busybox is invoked with --help.  This will add lots of text to the
38   busybox binary.  In the default configuration, this will add about
39   13k, but it can add much more depending on your configuration.
40
41 Enable automatic symlink creation for BusyBox built-in applets
42 CONFIG_FEATURE_INSTALLER
43   Enable 'busybox --install [-s]' support.  This will allow you to use
44   busybox at runtime to create hard links or symlinks for all the
45   applets that are compiled into busybox.  This feature requires the
46   /proc filesystem.
47
48 Locale support
49 CONFIG_LOCALE_SUPPORT
50   Enable this if your system has locale support, and you would like
51   busybox to support locale settings.
52
53 Enable devfs support
54 CONFIG_FEATURE_DEVFS
55   Enable if you want BusyBox to work with devfs.
56
57 Enable devfs support
58 CONFIG_FEATURE_DEVPTS
59   Enable if you want BusyBox to use Unix98 PTY support. If enabled,
60   busybox will use /dev/ptmx for the master side of the pseudoterminal
61   and /dev/pts/<number> for the slave side.  Otherwise, BSD style
62   /dev/ttyp<number> will be used. To use this option, you should have
63   devpts or devfs mounted.
64
65 Clean up all memory before exiting
66 CONFIG_FEATURE_CLEAN_UP
67   As a size optimization, busybox by default does not cleanup memory
68   that is dynamically allocated or close files before exiting. This
69   saves space and is usually not needed since the OS will clean up for
70   us.  Don't enable this unless you have a really good reason to clean
71   things up manually.
72
73 Buffers allocation policy
74 CONFIG_FEATURE_BUFFERS_USE_MALLOC
75   There are 3 ways BusyBox can handle buffer allocations:
76   - Use malloc. This costs code size for the call to xmalloc.
77   - Put them on stack. For some very small machines with limited stack
78     space, this can be deadly.  For most folks, this works just fine.
79   - Put them in BSS. This works beautifully for computers with a real
80     MMU (and OS support), but wastes runtime RAM for uCLinux. This
81     behavior was the only one available for BusyBox versions 0.48 and
82     earlier.
83
84 Enable the ar applet
85 CONFIG_AR
86   ar is an archival utility program used to create, modify, and
87   extract contents from archives.  An archive is a single file holding
88   a collection of other files in a structure that makes it possible to
89   retrieve the original individual files (called archive members).
90   The original files' contents, mode (permissions), timestamp, owner,
91   and group are preserved in the archive, and can be restored on
92   extraction.  
93   On an x86 system, the ar applet adds about XXX bytes.
94
95   Unless you have a specific application which requires ar, you should
96   probably say N here.
97
98 Enable the bunzip2 applet
99 CONFIG_BUNZIP2
100   bunzip2 is an compression utility using the Burrows-Wheeler block
101   sorting text compression algorithm, and Huffman coding.  Compression
102   is generally considerably better than that achieved by more
103   conventional LZ77/LZ78-based compressors, and approaches the
104   performance of the PPM family of statistical compressors.  
105   
106   The BusyBox bunzip2 applet is limited to de-compression only.  On an
107   x86 system, this applet adds about XXX bytes.
108   
109   Unless you have a specific application which requires bunzip2, you
110   should probably say N here.
111
112 # FIXME -- document the rest of the BusyBox config options....
113
114 Enable the run-parts applet
115 CONFIG_RUN_PARTS
116   run-parts is an utility designed to run all the scripts in a directory.
117
118   It is useful to set up a directory like cron.daily, where you need to
119   execute all the scripts in that directory.
120
121   This implementation of run-parts doesn't accept long options, and
122   some features (like report mode) aren't implemented.
123
124   Unless you know that run-parts is used in some of your scripts
125   you can safely say N here.
126
127 # The following sets edit modes for GNU EMACS
128 # Local Variables:
129 # case-fold-search:nil
130 # fill-prefix:"  "
131 # adaptive-fill:nil
132 # fill-column:70
133 # End: